The Ukrainian artist has found a new home in Tábor. For her, painting is also therapy with the help of her homeland iROZHLAS

The Ukrainian painter Anna Kulbanská fled before the war with her young son to Tábor in South Bohemia. She finds new friends there, with whom she prepares a charity exhibition of her paintings. He also wants to support her husband, who is fighting in eastern Ukraine against the Russian occupiers.




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Twenty-nine-year-old teacher Anna Kulbanská recently taught painting to children at a school in the Ukrainian town of Kalush. It is now the fourth week in the Czech Republic where she and her grandson Alexander have fled the war. She found a new home in Tábor, South Bohemia.

Listen to a report on Ukrainian painter Anna Kulbanska

“I am working on a series of paintings called Angels for Ukraine. I chose the theme because angels help wherever needed. Angels protect our country, our families and our homes. They fight for us because they are a symbol of peace. That’s why I chose soft, gentle colors, ”describes the artist, who is preparing a charity exhibition of her paintings, so she wants to help her country.

She tried charity auction a few days ago, when she successfully auctioned her first charity painting titled Obraz Anděl nad městem in the Šatna gallery in Tábor. A total of 18 works were auctioned.

“I attended an art auction for the first time in my life. I am surprised by the interest of people, their willingness to contribute. There is a good atmosphere here, as well as an excellent result of the auction, which finally raised 100,000 crowns. I am happy that I was able to get involved and help Ukraine in this way, ”describes Kulbanská.

The artist Anna came to Tábor a month ago. At first, her relatives helped her a lot, now she takes care of herself.

Anna Kublanská found new friends in Tábor, such as the painter Teodor Buzu. | Photo: Dana Bogges | Source: Czech Radio

“Three days after the war started, my husband, like many other healthy men, joined the army as a volunteer. He made a good decision, he did the right thing. He is now at the front, defending our country, fighting the occupiers. My grandson and I fled to Bohemia before the war. There was nothing to wait for. My husband has relatives here in Tábor, so I went here, I have support in them,” he describes.

One of the first people Anna met in Tábor was Teodor Buzu, an academic painter of Moldavian origin who knew Ukraine well.

“A young woman with a child, a painter from Ukraine, appeared here, of course I took her to our school and my friends made a collection; we bought paintings and canvases. In addition to children, I also teach adults at the Elementary Art School in Tábor. I was very happy that the adult student group made Anna very welcome,” says Teodor Buzu.


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Anna Kulbanská paints in Tábor whenever she has time. Most often at Teodor Buzu’s house then at home in the evening when his son falls asleep.

“At the beginning of the war, I kept watching the news, I was constantly on the phone. I was under great psychological pressure, and it started to show that I had a headache. Then, I started painting and drawing, it’s really great therapy, which has now become an enjoyable duty thanks to the overlapping benefits,” she describes how painting helps her.

In addition to painting, Anna studies Czech. But he mainly takes care of his four-year-old son Alexander.

“Little Sasha thought during the first days we came to Tábor to visit. Then she started to miss him, he wanted to go home, he kept asking when we were coming back, when dad was coming back, now he was getting used to it little by little. I try to explain to him why we are here and why we can’t go home yet,” explains the painter, whose son will celebrate his fourth birthday this week.

Anna Kulbanská thinks she will celebrate the next, the fifth and her father again in their house in Ukraine.

Jan Kopriva

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