Visit to an oasis of calm near the Dnipro. Hidden prayers at home jams and sewing Ukrainian flags iROZHLAS

The Dnipropetrovsk region in eastern Ukraine is an increasingly common target of Russian aggression. Russia is attacking airports or infrastructure there. And then there are still oases of peace where life goes on, as if war was taking place somewhere at the end of the world. But this is only the first impression.




From the site journalist
Dnipro

Share on Facebook




Share on Twitter


Share on LinkedIn


To print



Copy URL address




Abbreviated address





close




Tatiana Vasilyevna lives with her husband Nikolai Ivanovich in a beautiful decorated house in one of the picturesque villages around the city of Dnipro.

Nikolai shows on the wall photographs of Mrs. Tatiana’s ancestors, who founded a large land here, and the Bolsheviks took everything from them – except for the house we are talking about now.

Martin Dorazín filmed in an oasis of calm near the Dnieper

Thanks to the refusal of homemade brandy and wine, Mrs. Tatiana spreads the table, pours tea and begins to talk about walking four kilometers to school, studying in a high school, working as a director of the ‘one of the main transport companies of the Dnieper, but the heart always drew him to his native village.

“My ancestors came from Belarus, and I am a purebred Belarusian. In 1794, Empress Catherine II. moved 200 Belarusian families, who began to cultivate flax fields here. But he just did not come here, but everything else grows like out of water. We like to work in the garden and we mainly like tomatoes, but this year nature can’t catch up with us. It’s cold this year,” he says. there in Radiožurnál.

“I trust in God”


They don’t drive at night, you see checks, militiamen and refugees during the day, a journalist describes a trip to Ukraine

Read the article


Tatiana Vasilyevna remembers that everyone lived together. Belarusians, Lithuanians, Russians and Ukrainians – like Mr. Nikolai, a total of more than twenty nationalities. Tatiana Vasilyevna does not understand how Russia could start a war against them.

“It hurts a lot. I want there to be peace and little children not to know war. We are not politicians and we probably don’t understand everything that is going on, but I want everyone everyone can go home. I’m a very sociable person and I have a lot of good friends, but a lot of them have gone abroad. I want them to come back and everything was the same. And I’m counting on God. I have never prayed like I do now. I pray morning and night and ask God to give us peace.”

Tatiana not only prays, but also works: she sews Ukrainian flags, which are rare. And having drunk a fantastic black tea, we went to work – more precisely, to the workshop of Mrs. Tatiana Vasilyevna. She took the blue and yellow fabric out of the closet, sat down at her sewing machine, and got to work. She has already made about forty of these flags and in the next few days, she will sew another forty, at least.

He plans to sew at least 40 more flags Photo: Martin Dorazin Source: Czech Radio

Memories of the Second World War come back to Mrs. Tatiana: “At that time, many people from the city were hiding with us. Our family hid a Jewish family from the Dnieper. My grandfather was far-sighted and built a large, deep cellar. They lived there throughout the war – until 1943, when the front moved away from us. The winery is over a hundred years old, trucks are passing by and the winery has started to collapse. He’s no longer safe.”


We have a common enemy. We must unite and help, says one of the Israeli soldiers in Ukraine

Read the article


I wonder where they will hide if Russia, God forbid, starts bombing the village. A cellar with preserves will serve as cover.

Mrs. Tatiana shows me a cave where they could hide in case of a raid. It’s the only safe place because there’s a reinforced concrete slab above us. Everything is homemade here, including watermelon, corn, peas, plums, strawberries, potatoes – everything thrives here.

“I give it to my neighbors and friends. We don’t eat everything ourselves, but my husband likes it when there’s a lot of everything. We can supply the whole village with it.”

As a pensioner, I take away not only watermelon in brine and homemade tomato juice, but also a feeling of great concern for all those friendly, hospitable and sympathetic Ukrainians.

Everything is house in the basement, everything is fine here Photo: Martin Dorazín Source: Czech Radio

Martin Dorazin

Share on Facebook




Share on Twitter


Share on LinkedIn


To print



Copy URL address




Abbreviated address





close




Leave a Comment