Sanctions will be imposed on Russian oil after coal. We need to push hard, admits EU Commissioner Jourová iROZHLAS

It took two days for the European Union to agree on a fifth package of anti-Russian sanctions. What are the differences between member countries on how to punish Russian leaders for invading Ukraine? Who and how will the newly approved sanctions affect? Vladimír Kroc asked Věra Jourová, Vice-President of the European Commission.




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European Commissioner Věra Jourová Source: Profimedia

Recall that last week EU representatives agreed on a fifth package of anti-Russian sanctions. But why did it take them two days?
I think it was the coal. I think we are now at a time where we are tightening sanctions on the trajectory of coal, oil and gas. I suppose there will be oil in the sixth package which is in preparation.

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I must say that in all of us who have an influence on this, the feeling of being responsible and not being a coward arises. Of course, with each new image of massacred Ukrainian towns and killed civilians, the anger and desire to do something vigorous increases. At the same time, the statesmen sitting around the table, in this case the ambassadors, must consider how heavy the penalty will be for each country and how heavy they will be with the consent of their constituents.

According to Brussels, Moscow will lose four billion euros a year by cutting itself off from the European coal market. Why did Germany impose a so-called transition period of four months? Isn’t that too much in the context of what you said? Shouldn’t the West really be more forceful in its approach to the Kremlin?
He did, I think he did, and that’s my personal opinion. So here in my files it’s eight billion a year, but it almost doesn’t matter.

In any case, when we prepare sanctions in committee, we always have the same dilemma: should we deploy it high, with the danger that it is simply not practicable for certain statesmen, for the asymmetrical effects and the disagreement of their citizens, or whether to negotiate the lowest possible denominator to get it through.


So far, we’ve been going the other way, but like I said, we’re all excited now about the atrocities going on there, and I think we should tighten up.

And can you indicate how drastic the sixth sanctions package currently being considered should be? Or when should he start chatting?
All I know is that there should be oil, an import ban, that more people and entities should be added to the list, that maybe we should negotiate new bans on export from Europe, because we also have to technologically ruin Russia. There are a lot of sanctions that we have already launched.

I cannot give you the precise details because I do not know them, we are currently discussing them in the Commission. It’s interesting to see how it works, because with each sanction we assess the impacts and, as I said, the impacts on European countries are asymmetrical.

Wood, champagne, vodka, cement, caviar, all of this should therefore be subject to import restrictions. How can I understand what is the size? Isn’t this a total embargo?
Until now, I thought so.


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I’m just wondering if I understood correctly. If it is an import restriction, it may not be complete.
There are a few exceptions, but I’m going to jump into another area a bit: transportation, whether it’s road or ocean freight. There are exceptions to transportation of I suspect health care, humanitarian aid. I think it’s good that there’s a gap, but here for these imports I think it’s absolute. But I could be wrong.

Russian companies will now be banned from participating in tenders for public contracts in EU countries. But that should have been a long time ago, right?
The ban could have been enforced by individual states, but it was expected to rumble on from Brussels, which happened last week. I know that was also a fundamental thing for Czech municipalities and regions, who asked me what it looked like with the pan-European ban. It is here, to be excluded from all markets, from all calls for tenders, not to draw from the public coffers the slightest European or state money. I think it’s absolutely necessary.

What scenarios is the European Commission prepared for in case Russian gas suddenly stops flowing to Europe? And why, in the case of Hungary, why has the EU for the first time in history taken a path that could end all revenue from the common budget? Listen to the full interview with Věra Jourová conducted by Vladimír Kroc.

Vladimir Kroc, jkh

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