Dozens of Ukrainian children study in Stodůlky. How is their Czech? He befriends Czech classmates through games

War has been raging in Eastern Europe for over a month. The Czech Republic and its citizens were among the first to react to the Russian invasion of Ukraine on a larger scale. Condemnation of the military invasion, symbolic support and solidarity have been game-changing and continue to move the entire Czech Republic across generations and professions. Already in the last days of February in Stodůlky, Prague, there was an intention to organize a school for the children of Ukrainian refugees. It actually opened in March. It is visited by nearly 30 children, from the youngest to the most mature.



Two classes for children of Ukrainian refugees have been opened at Prague Stodůlky Lyceum for International and Public Relations.  Ukrainian teachers and high school students of Ukrainian origin take part in their teaching.  The grand opening of the school also included a singing performance by young students.  They sang the Ukrainian song Ukraina, it's you.  (March 25, 2022)


© David Zima
Two classes for children of Ukrainian refugees have been opened at Prague Stodůlky Lyceum for International and Public Relations. Ukrainian teachers and high school students of Ukrainian origin take part in their teaching. The grand opening of the school also included a singing performance by young students. They sang the Ukrainian song Ukraina, it’s you. (March 25, 2022)

Especially for children, it is sensitive trauma, who, overlooking the ruins of bombed-out cities, even as she lay in the rubble and burnt remains more than one school they can wear for life. Without speaking about hurt whose the dead, that will come to their eyes as a result of the war.

Many have been “lucky” with their families they could flee beyond the borders of a war-torn country. It is already located in the Czech Republic more than 230,000 registered refugees, while in Prague, according to the statistics available to the municipality, women and children have the absolute predominance. The little ones are on High school of international and public relations (GMVV) has already opened two classes in Prague 13.

Pupils and teachers from Ukraine

They have 28 children, they take care of them six Ukrainian teacherswhile four of them arrived in Bohemia as a result of the war. Ukrainian students also help them. “We tested that it would work, and we will be smug, during our spring break, when a kind of pilot week took place,” school principal Šimon Zajíček told Blesk.cz.

Intention about the creation of special Ukrainian classes, he has already started bludgeoning in his head in the early days of the war. “While I was studying international relations, various scenarios went through my mind, including the wave of migration that is often associated with wars,” admits the executive. “So I started to wonder if we as a school could help each other like other schools. Four days after the invasion, we already had four families from Ukraine in Stodulky. “

They started to grow. “We currently have about 200 school children and 50 preschoolers. We also have a recreational facility ready for 45 children with families“said longtime mayor of Prague 13 David Vodrážka (ODS).”We do little, but we try to do what we can. In the Czech Republic, we stand with Ukraine and its people, and we will help them as long as necessary,” added Zajíček.

What regime is provided for Ukrainian students? “We have two classes, one lower, the other upper. The two classes are taught separately, in charge of six Ukrainian teacherswho has established cooperation with us thanks to the House of National Minorities, and more specifically Mrs. Olga Mandová, who is in charge of the Ukrainian national minority in our country,” said the Director General.

New friends

“The kids were looking forward to going to school. I think it’s for them welcome distraction after what they had to go through, “Zajíček encounters war and a painful journey beyond the borders of his homeland, which often lasted several days. They were helped in acclimatization by high school students of Ukrainian origin. “She was known in the early days for older students who were already more aware of reality emotional insecurity vis-à-vis their loved ones who remained in Ukraine. But during the days they are happier, also thanks to the fact that they get to know the Czech environment, with their Czech peers. »

Of course, the initial communication was blocked due to the language barrier. After all, Ukrainian children are shy, for Czechs it was also a new situation. According to Zajíček, however, they made “their” together breaks and space out player. “We have a newly equipped school digital bulletin boards. Ukrainian children quickly found them, and soon with the Czechs played a variety of games and competitions“pleases the executive. He also intends to bring the students together with the help of joint thematic events, such as the “duel of Ukrainian-Czech cuisine”, when Czech students will learn to cook Ukrainian dishes, Ukrainian students, on the other hand, Czech students.

Teaching Czech in Ukraine

Teachers approach students according to standard Czech timetables. “We have covered all common Czech topics, including Czechwhere the lower tier has three hours per week, the upper tier has four. At the same time, however, we also respect Ukrainian subjects, because they have a different curriculum there,” Zajíček explained. According to him, the younger ones are doing better with Czech so far.”Today, it happens that he walks in the corridors or the streets, and greets each other in Czech. “

Extension?

High school goes as far as it can go. No more Ukrainian pupils will be placed on the school benches in Stodůlky. Therefore, Bunny considers other options, such as the influx of refugees has not stopped. Cooperation with the CEVRO Institute is possible. “In the center of Prague we could have up to two more courseswhich would double the teaching capacity we could provide. The problem would not be a problem to secure educators who enroll in the school on a large scale.

The grand opening of the two classes symbolically ended performances of the youngest Ukrainian students who sang the song Ukraina, toi toi! “We are very moved to see that the whole Czech society addresses our problem and tries to make the survivors forget the horrors they had to live through.At the end of the class opening ceremony, Ukrainian Ambassador Yevhen Perebyjnis hailed the school’s initiative.

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