Three community centers in the Czech Republic help veterans. More than 300 retirees turned to them last year iROZHLAS

Mental problems after returning from the mission, but also daily problems in the family or with finances. Veterans of the Czech Republic face all of this. Specialized community centers can help them. They offer psychological, legal and economic advice. So far there are three in the country – in military hospitals in Brno, Olomouc and Prague. Their number is expected to increase in the future.




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Mental problems after returning from the mission, but also daily problems in the family or with finances. Veterans in the Czech Republic face it all (illustration photo) Photo: Michal Olbert | Source: Army of the Czech Republic

“I was in a difficult family life. I was clear about the divorce… we had certain feelings, we no longer knew how to manage it or what to do next”, a veteran who wished to remain anonymous recalls for Radiožurnál his problems family.

He spent several months on a mission in Iraq. He himself consulted a psychologist a few years ago.

Specialized community centers offer the help of a psychologist or legal and financial advice, read more in the contribution of Vít Andrle

“The family suffers because the father is on a mission, the mother stays at home with the children and has to deal with what is happening. When the father comes back, it is quite complicated before he settles down “, he adds.

Psychological counseling is also offered to retired soldiers by the Prague Community Center of the Central Military Hospital. Some veterans come alone, but more often they only seek help on the recommendation of a doctor.

They are most troubled by problems related to everyday life, as the psychologist of the Central Military Hospital Vratislav Simon says: “It means difficulties related to stress, in the field of work, in the relationship … something that life will bring. Maybe it can be after a serious situation in the family, someone gets sick…”

Even family therapy

According to him, relatives of veterans can also turn to the psychologist. “It can also be as a couple, a soldier comes with marital difficulties, marital difficulties. They can also come as a family when what is happening there affects the whole family. “


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But in addition to mental issues, retired military personnel face other challenges. Therefore, they also offer them legal advice at the Community Center in Prague.

Ladislav Miklas from the legal department of the Central Military Hospital explains what veterans most often need.

“Land transfers, divorces, family law, family disputes, domestic violence, parent-child relationship. Then it’s service in the army, with active veterans or even veterans. It solves, for example , current relationships in the workplace – superior vs. subordinate relationships, mission assignments,” he lists.

Veterans are also in trouble because they are in dire financial straits.

“A war veteran, for various reasons – personal, vending machines, unsuccessful business – falls into a so-called debt trap and suddenly there he is. Now we have one for maybe 40 million. We’re trying to balance that, to find a way for it to somehow live and function,” Miklas describes.

Regional Community Centers

At the community center, he therefore also advises war pensioners on how to earn money and not end up in the execution, for example, or how to deal with addiction. Veterans can also use the services of a chaplain.


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In addition to the community center in Prague, there are two more in the Czech Republic – in Brno and Olomouc. Over time more should be added. Defense Minister Jana Černochová of the ODS previously promised that they would be present in all regions. This is also welcomed by the war veteran, who helps himself at the community center in Prague.

“We are a hidden community. Some civilians or foreigners do not see us. They do not know what we are going through and what our problems are. I definitely support this activity, and if there is an event, I will be happy to come to help. “

According to the Ministry of Defence, there are almost 16,000 modern war veterans in the Czech Republic who took part in missions abroad after 1989. Last year, more than 300 of them used advisory services.

Vit Andrle

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