War leaves wounds in the soul. Psychologists in Poland also help refugees from Ukraine iROZHLAS

Flight from the war, a few days on the road, without sleep, without food with an uncertain vision of the future. Refugees from Ukraine fight this not only when they leave threatened areas. Mental problems can accompany them even after they are brought to safety. Psychologists who also speak to them in their mother tongue are ready to help them in the reception centers for refugees in Poland.




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Warsaw

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In reception centers for refugees in Poland there are psychologists who also speak to them in their mother tongue Photo: Pavel Novák | Source: Czech Radio

Tatiana escaped from bombed Severodonetsk in the Luhansk region with her daughter Maria. As he says, they saw the destruction with their own eyes.

Listen to a report about life in the Torwar Sports Hall refugee center in Warsaw

They hid in the basement for fourteen days before volunteer paramedics pulled them out and took them to a safer place. Then they arrived in Poland via Lviv, and now they are thinking about where to go to the Torwar sports hall refugee center in Warsaw.

They are planning a trip to Finland, where there is a large Russian-speaking minority. “My mother died during all this. I couldn’t even bury her. We lived in a five-storey house on the top floor. Grenades exploded in the apartment next to us and we had no no choice but to move to the basement,” he told Radiožurnál.

“A two-week stay in the basement signed us. The girl caught a cold, so the female organs caught a cold, if you understand me. Her nerves are on the move. I still hold on despite everything. It’s still a shock for us. Corpses lie in the streets of our city. Nobody picks them up, because all the morgues are full. The city has practically ceased to exist,” he continues.


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Marije is 19 years old, she worked at the post office, where she also learned that the postmen organized an evacuation between them. They took them from Severodonetsk to a nearby town, where there was more peace, and from there they took a suburban train and then a long-distance connection to Lviv.

“Dogs and cats also lived with us in the basement. We shared everything with them. Even a cup of water. We placed various containers under the ceiling, and the whole bucket, for example, filled our drops, even with water oozing from the surface,” recalls Marija.

According to Tatiana, the war affected everyone’s life. She sought help from psychologists at the refugee center.

The priest also works in the center, so Tatiana turned to him as a believer. She was moved that in Poland she was given not only food and a place to sleep, but also clean sheets, a change of clothes and shoes. When they arrived with their daughter, they did not know where they came from and what would become of them.

Help for refugees

According to therapist Ada, the task of the psychologists at the refugee center is to immediately respond to the emotions of the refugees, who are very tired after a long journey.

They haven’t started healing psychotherapy yet, because the refugee center is only a temporary place for refugees. Therapy should begin when refugees find permanent residence and feel truly safe.


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“We are open to any form of help. We kiss these people, we caress them, we talk to them, we listen to them. We help them arrange serious and fairly insignificant matters. Sometimes we take care of children and try to creating an environment that makes them feel safe and happy again,” says Ada.

“It’s already a big step forward when they want to talk about what they’ve been through and they want them to understand it. Of course, there are a lot of tears. We understand them, we listen to them. We “We ask them more questions so they can talk about these experiences. But we also give them care and reassurance that they are already safe here, that nothing bad can happen to them here,” he concludes.

It’s 2 p.m. It is one of the fixed and immutable points of the daily routine of this refugee center. However, the inhabitants of the hall believe that they will soon exchange the sports center for another accommodation, where they will survive the time before they can return home to Ukraine.

Pavel Novak

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